Archive

Senate delays have played a role, but the White House has also been slow to put forward nominees for consideration.

Senate Republicans have pretty much no room for error as they try to rush through a health care bill in the next week.

More NHL and NBA teams have won consecutive championships than NFL and MLB. Here’s why.

A breakdown of who can get in under the new restrictions

Our quick-and-dirty app for scraping and juxtaposing TV commentary in real time

The Post tracked what cable news networks plastered across their viewers’ screens during the hearing.

President Trump suddenly fired FBI Director James Comey, and what to do about it is in the hands of Senate Republicans.

Only Obama has taken longer to fill out his Cabinet, though Trump was only one day shy of tying that mark.

House Republicans’ are facing decreasing opposition from moderates.

Enough Republicans publicly oppose the bill to kill it, but the White House is demanding a vote anyway.

It's unclear whether House leaders can attract enough votes at both ends of their party for passage.

A guide to the three-phase process Republicans plan to take to overhaul the nation’s health-care system.

Tracking these 662 executive branch appointments through the nomination process.

See which Zip codes are best and worse for real estate.

These logistical issues will be crucial to any border wall construction, no matter who pays for it.

Tracking the progress of Trump’s Cabinet picks

Trash the unpopular enemy or praise the controversial leader? This slight tweak in a speech’s framing implies a very different situation.

As state representatives listed off their delegate totals on the floor of Quicken Loans Arena, they also had some nice things to say about their home states.

Candidates do a lot of talking (some for too long), and it can be easy to just tune them out. So now we’re checking to see how well you’ve been paying attention.

Guns, abortion, foreign policy, terrorism, immigration. All have had their moments.

The Islamic State claimed responsibility for killing at least 130 people in a string of terrorist attacks Friday in Paris.

Create your own definition of “mass shooting” with this tool

In the fourth Republican debate of the 2016 election cycle, candidates began to differentiate themselves on specifics of their policies.

For the first time in 41 seasons of “Saturday Night Live,” a presidential candidate near the top of the polls will host the show. Donald Trump is scheduled to host Nov. 7.

Here’s how the other GOP candidates responded to Trumps conversation dominance.

Rubio and Cruz had breakout performances.

Having a child brings obvious new expenses – diapers, cribs, strollers and babysitters, to name a few. But for women, having children also has a noticeable effect on how much money they make.

A roundup of what we know about the attacks in Benghazi and how Hillary Clinton was involved.

Take a look at the issues discussed and exchanges between candidates.

Even the most crowded U.S. urban areas seem rural compared to others across the globe.

It's clear: Horrific violence grips us, then we forget.

Christians were reportedly singled out in the Oregon shoot. This is how often Christians suffer hate crimes.

At Wednesday night's Republican presidential debate, 11 candidates will take the stage in an unexpected order – with the outsiders very much on the inside.

Who makes the debate stage is based on many tough decisions about polling.

For all the drama that might unfold in Thursday night's debate, history tells us that it's unlikely to have a huge impact on the polls — though it could matter for a candidate or two.

The world leaders involved in the Iran nuclear deal used their public power as a negotiation tool. Many of the requirements, “red lines” and other strongly worded provisions leaders insisted on do not appear in the final agreement.

The State Department is in the process of releasing 30,000 emails from Hillary Clinton’s time as Secretary of State. Catch up on the controversy and read the emails below.

When Hillary Clinton handed over 30,000 e-mails to the State Department, she did so in a very 20th-century way: She had them all printed out.

The global wild tiger population is estimated at less than 4,500 animals, with about half of them living in India.

67 years of missing flights December 29, 2014

St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert P. McCulloch laid out this sequence of events in the Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown, assembled from physical evidence and witness testimony.

Fewer voters show up for midterm elections than in presidential years. The chart shows which party did better in matching its presidential vote in states with Senate races.

The Washington Post’s live election results pages.

If Scots vote to bid cheerio to the United Kingdom, the country would be independent as of March 2016. Here are some of the biggest changes that would occur.

Reimagining Union Station September 12, 2014
The best beer in baseball August 8, 2014
Do you know Africa? August 1, 2014
A field too far? June 26, 2014
Can you find Benghazi? June 17, 2014
Leagues of the World Cup June 12, 2014
The circular files May 13, 2014

Debugging in old browsers hurts. Here are some tips I use to ease the pain.

Beer Me, Minnesota! March 13, 2014

I'll be kicking off my career with the Washington Post in April as a graphics editor, and I am absolutely thrilled.

A Web of Influence December 22, 2013
Choose Your Own Donation December 22, 2013

Last year’s intern Jon Schleuss nailed the top five reasons to spend your summer in Seattle. Here’s my lame attempt to make it a top ten list.

How ranked-choice voting works September 15, 2013
The Ad Campaign July 15, 2013

Depict aims to easily render fallback images for complex visualizations. (IE 8, I'm looking at you.) Given a url and css selector, depict outputs a .png of the rendered element. With depict, charts based on living data can be rendered into flat images at regular intervals, no human interaction required.

A Nation of Wineries July 7, 2013

The brilliant Krzysztof Dorosz has developed csvpys, an extension to the data journalist must-have csvkit.

It’s not every day that you get to write your own job description, but the good folks at the Star Tribune let me do just that.

Introducing: Binify April 18, 2013

There’s nothing less funny than listening to a journalism professor joking that we’re all in this field because we can’t do math. Some of the best journalism being done today only exists because journalists overcame their fear of numbers and dug deep into the data.

Guns and deadly streets March 16, 2013

Questioned on The New York Times’s use of D3 for graphics, even though IE 7 and 8 do not support it, Amanda Cox gave this response:

Minnesota's Radon Zones February 8, 2013
Data-driven opinion February 4, 2013

In yesterday’s New York Times, I ran across an unusual opinion piece on gerrymandering. Sam Wang, the column’s author, made his argument with data.

It looks like garbage when Facebook goes down.

Think graphics should be made strictly by designers? Take a look at this.

Over the past two days, an exceptional conversation has crawled out of a seemingly innocent post. The focus changed from a question on fair compensation for multifaceted journalists to case studies on why some of us are in this field.

In response to journalism.co.uk’s list of 100 Twitter accounts every journalism student should follow, I have collected a similar list of Twitter accounts every data journalist should follow. The list is available on Twitter here. I’m sure I missed some, so please let me know who should be added.

It's interesting that you compare these software processes to building wrist watches. As a journalism and computer science double major, I am always looking to apply techniques from one area of study to the other.

Today I am releasing django-wordpress-rss – a Django template tag for integrating Wordpress articles. It’s available today via PyPI.

Stay classy, Seattle August 25, 2012

Ten short weeks ago, I walked through this same airport. I was apprehensive of the situation: A brand new city, a new job, not a soul within 20 hours’ drive that I personally knew. I put my Midwestern life on hold in pursuit of a strange career.

This morning I accepted a different type of job. I’ll be a photographer at the University of Minnesota’s award-winning student newspaper: The Minnesota Daily.

I'm leaving Facebook August 3, 2012

I’m leaving Facebook. And probably not for the reason you’d expect.

Do you?

Web technologies have exploded over the past few years, and the government appears to be trying to keep up. Finally.

Those were the words I heard the other day, from Seattle Times photojournalist Bettina Hansen. With today’s technology, everyone is a pro at taking photos. Shell out $600 for a decent DSLR and watch a 15 minute YouTube tutorial video, and you’ll impress your friends with the results.

I’ve been at the Seattle Times for four weeks now. Apparently time flies when you love your job, too. We’re working on some pretty great stuff, but we finally took the curtain off of my first real project.

The last few days have been bewildering for anyone following the Vikings stadium debacle. Late last night, the Minnesota Senate passed a version of a bill, and the night before, the House did the same. As I watched Tweetdeck fill in with updates all day, one tweet came called me to action:

Looking back April 5, 2012

These past two years have been unbelievable.

Earlier this week, MinnPost published an interactive map showing same-day registrations in precincts throughout Minnesota. Here, we walk through how we made it happen — both to document our work and, we hope, to help others who might be interested in building something similar.

At MinnPost, we wanted to find a good way to turn pdf files into a searchable, sortable database. With many election finance reports going public in the past few weeks, I figured I’d share what I’ve learned — now’s the perfect time.

Editorial arrogance January 3, 2012

I finally got around to seeing Page One last night, a documentary about the New York Times, and a certain point hit harder than the rest.

I came up with a fun idea last night, on my everlasting quest to provide journalists with tools to create interactive graphics on their own.

This past week, I worked with election data for the first time. Beth Hawkins, education reporter at MinnPost, wanted to do something special for the school district levy election. She forwarded me a document from the Minnesota Secretary of State containing information about the then upcoming election. She was hoping for a way to display, on a map, which school districts passed their referendums.

For a recent MinnPost project, we wanted to scrape court dockets, so I figured I’d break out a python script in the wonderful ScraperWiki. One of my favorite features is that you can schedule a scraper to run automatically. One of my least favorite features is that the limit on automatic scrapers is once per day. We needed something to run every half hour.

Our Hacks/Hackers group came together around the idea of building a tool for reporters with no technical background to be able to create an interactive element. We decided on Google Charts because of their popularity and simplicity. Since we had only six hours, we focused solely on bar graphs.

What's in a web app? May 13, 2011

I’ve always wondered but have never been in a position to make the call between native or web apps. For the mobile redesign of mndaily.com, we had to make this decision. And we went with a web app. Here’s why: